Thursday File Buzz

News, photos and quotes I have found interesting.

twitter.com/thursdayfile:

    “This is the worst possible time for Britain to consider leaving the EU – or for Scotland to break with Britain. The EU is an unfinished project of European states that have sacrificed part of their sovereignty to form an ever-closer union based on shared values and ideals. Those shared values are under attack on multiple fronts. Russia’s undeclared war against Ukraine is perhaps the most immediate example but it is by no means the only one. Resurgent nationalism and illiberal democracy are on the rise within Europe, at its borders and around the globe.” Soros does acknowledge one factor that would justify independence, and that is if the U.K. decides to leave the E.U. in 2017: "Only if Britain fails to resolve its differences with the EU, and if the pro-European Scots (having voted to remain within the UK) thus find themselves unwillingly excluded from Europe in 2017, would there be just cause for Scots to call for a new referendum. If it comes to that, Scotland will be in a different position – one that could legitimise a split.But to vote for independence from the UK now would be to prematurely surrender Scottish leverage in London, and Britain’s leverage in the world.” - George Soros—-George Soros, HungarianBorn August 12, 1930, as Schwartz GyörgyHe is a Hungarian-born American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist. He is the chairman of Soros Fund Management. He is known as “The Man Who Broke the Bank of England” because of his short sale of US$10 billion worth of pounds, giving him a profit of $1 billion during the 1992 Black Wednesday UK currency crisis.Soros is a well-known supporter of progressive-liberal political causes. He played a significant role in the peaceful transition from communism to capitalism in Hungary (1984–89) and provided one of Europe’s largest higher education endowments to Central European University in Budapest. Soros is also the chairman of the Open Society Foundations.—www.thursdayfile.com

    This is the worst possible time for Britain to consider leaving the EU – or for Scotland to break with Britain.
    The EU is an unfinished project of European states that have sacrificed part of their sovereignty to form an ever-closer union based on shared values and ideals. Those shared values are under attack on multiple fronts. Russia’s undeclared war against Ukraine is perhaps the most immediate example but it is by no means the only one. Resurgent nationalism and illiberal democracy are on the rise within Europe, at its borders and around the globe.”
    Soros does acknowledge one factor that would justify independence, and that is if the U.K. decides to leave the E.U. in 2017:
    "Only if Britain fails to resolve its differences with the EU, and if the pro-European Scots (having voted to remain within the UK) thus find themselves unwillingly excluded from Europe in 2017, would there be just cause for Scots to call for a new referendum. If it comes to that, Scotland will be in a different position – one that could legitimise a split.
    But to vote for independence from the UK now would be to prematurely surrender Scottish leverage in London, and Britain’s leverage in the world. - George Soros
    —-
    George Soros, Hungarian
    Born August 12, 1930, as Schwartz György
    He is a Hungarian-born American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist. He is the chairman of Soros Fund Management. He is known as “The Man Who Broke the Bank of England” because of his short sale of US$10 billion worth of pounds, giving him a profit of $1 billion during the 1992 Black Wednesday UK currency crisis.
    Soros is a well-known supporter of progressive-liberal political causes. He played a significant role in the peaceful transition from communism to capitalism in Hungary (1984–89) and provided one of Europe’s largest higher education endowments to Central European University in Budapest. Soros is also the chairman of the Open Society Foundations.

    www.thursdayfile.com

    — 1 day ago with 5 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #George Soros  #Scotland  #independence  #referendum  #tf uk  #tf scotland  #scotland referendum 
    The United States now contains 1,000,000 reasons to explore. As of 7:45am on Sunday, September 14, the 1,000,000th active geocache in the U.S. was published on Geocaching.com. The site launched in 2000 with just 75 geocaches.The 1,000,000th U.S. geocache is call Daddy’s Fishing Hole and is located near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. The 8 Most Amazing Geocaches in the US for BeginnersSeptember 15 2014 - Article
www.thursdayfile.com
Q- Do you have a Geocache or are thinking of activating one?

    The United States now contains 1,000,000 reasons to explore. As of 7:45am on Sunday, September 14, the 1,000,000th active geocache in the U.S. was published on Geocaching.com. The site launched in 2000 with just 75 geocaches.
    The 1,000,000th U.S. geocache is call Daddy’s Fishing Hole and is located near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.
    The 8 Most Amazing Geocaches in the US for Beginners
    September 15 2014 - Article

    www.thursdayfile.com

    Q- Do you have a Geocache or are thinking of activating one?

    — 1 day ago with 4 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf usa  #geocache  #Daddy's Fishing Hole  #Chambersburg  #Pennsylvania 

    Blue Lyretail (Fundulopanchax gardneri)
    Also known as the Gardner’s Killi or Steel-blue aphyoseminon, the blue lyre tail is a species of Nothobranchiid killifish which inhabits the tributary streams and marshes of the Benue and Cross River basins of Nigeria and Cameroon. Where it occurs in both savanna and forested regions.
    Like many other killifish species Fundulopanchax gardneri has become quite popular in the aquarium trade
    Classification:
    Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Cyprinodontiformes-Nothobranchiidae-Fundulopanchax-F. gardneri

    — 2 days ago with 5 notes
    #Blue Lyretail  #TF fish  #Fundulopanchax gardneri  #Fundulopanchax  #Gardner’s Killi  #Killi  #killifish  #Steel-blue aphyoseminon 

     Dear Scotland: An open letter from your Canadian cousins
    editorial by ‘The Globe and Mail’ — Monday, September 15 2014
    Dear Scotland,
    "You probably don’t know this, but you made us. The first European to cross the continent and reach our Pacific coast was Alexander Mackenzie – a Scot. Our first prime minister and chief Father of Confederation, Sir John A. Macdonald? Scottish. So too our second PM. Our country’s national dream, a railroad from sea to sea, was realized in 1885 when Sir Donald Smith, head of the Canadian Pacific Railway, drove The Last Spike at Craigellachie – a place named after a village in his homeland. The man who did the most to create Canada’s system of universal public health care, and chosen as “The Greatest Canadian” in a national survey of CBC viewers, was Tommy Douglas. He was born in Falkirk. The thistle and the red lion rampant on our national coat of arms identify you as one of our four founding nations; half of our provincial flags contain a Saint Andrew’s cross; and one of our provinces – Nova Scotia – is named after you. There are said to be more pipers and pipe bands in Canada than in Scotland. And nearly five million Canadians identify their ethnic origin as entirely or partly Scottish, which means we have almost as many Scottish-Canadians as you have people.
    You made us – and as a gesture of thanks, we’d like to offer some advice on how to avoid unmaking yourself. This bit of history you are living right now? This referendum thing? We’ve already been through that. We may be a young nation but we have far more experience than you on this issue. We nearly tore our country apart. Twice.
    The independence side in your referendum campaign is to be commended for a few things. There’s no ethnic nationalism at the heart of the Yes movement, and that is no small accomplishment. And the question to be asked on the 18th of September – “Should Scotland be an independent country? – sounds remarkably clear and simple. The Quebec independence movement never dared ask anything so straightforward, because outright independence has never been favoured by anything close to a majority of the Quebec population.
    Compare your question with the one asked of Quebeckers in 1980: “The Government of Quebec has made public its proposal to negotiate a new agreement with the rest of Canada, based on the equality of nations; this agreement would enable Quebec to acquire the exclusive power to make its laws, levy its taxes and establish relations abroad – in other words, sovereignty – and at the same time to maintain with Canada an economic association including a common currency; any change in political status resulting from these negotiations will only be implemented with popular approval through another referendum; on these terms, do you give the Government of Quebec the mandate to negotiate the proposed agreement between Quebec and Canada?”
    The Scottish question is shorter and simpler. But is it really clearer? It has not escaped the notice of us, your cousins from across the seas, that much of the case made by the Scottish Yes campaign is neatly described by our fuzzy 1980 question. “Sovereignty” but maintaining “an economic association”? Check. A new country, but also a plan to “negotiate a new agreement” with the old nation? Check. A Yes vote portrayed as promising co-operation rather than a severing of ties? Check. And the idea that you can leave but keep the currency? Sorry, we’ve heard this song before.
    The Yes campaign in Scotland, as reasonable as it imagines itself, seems to believe in the unreasonable proposition that you can improve your marriage by getting a divorce. It doesn’t work that way. The Yes campaign also promises that post-divorce negotiations will take place in an atmosphere of complete calm and rationality – and that rump Britain will give it what it wants. But that glosses over the fact that the other side has demands, too. Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond said recently that, if Britain didn’t let an independent Scotland continue to use the pound, Scotland might refuse to assume its share of the national debt.
    Mr. Salmond has the greatest interest in maintaining the fiction that normalcy will reign and reason will rule in the event of a Yes victory – and yet the mere mention of a hypothetical negotiation has even him testily making threats. How well do you think it will go if things move beyond the hypothetical? Having looked over the edge of the precipice that you are marching up to, and having dipped our toe into the volcano more than once, we can tell you: It will not go well at all.
    There is an alternative to independence: federalism. It’s something we’ve been practising and perfecting for a century and a half. You’ve been at it for a decade and a half. Give it time. We’re not sure if the “Devo Max” plans to devolve nearly complete responsibility for taxation to the Scottish Parliament, plans being floated by the British government in the final days of a referendum, are necessarily the way to go. But some devolution of taxing authority can take place. The Scottish Parliament has little power to raise its own revenues – whereas Canadian provinces have a full range of taxation and spending powers. That’s federalism. That’s how strong subnational and national governments can coexist.
    Once upon a time in Quebec, the independence option was the choice of the young, as it is in Scotland. That time has passed; most young Quebeckers today do not imagine that their very real economic and social challenges will be addressed by drawing a new border. But it took us a half-century to get to this point. The same can happen for you, too.
    So, dear cousins from beyond the seas, here is our advice and our plea: Stay in the United Kingdom. Let time pass and passions subside. Make changes happen, but within the U.K. And meet us back here in, say, 2040. You can take the U.K. apart then, if you still want to. We think you will not. And we know this: If you take it apart now, you can never, ever put it back together again.” - Globe and Mail editorial

    www.thursdayfile.com
    ——
    Q - Do you think Scotland will vote ‘YES’ or ‘No’?

    — 2 days ago with 5 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf uk  #tf Scotland  #Scotland  #referendum  #independence 
    theeconomist:

Who gets murdered in America USA
The murder rate in America among black men between the ages of 20-24 is over 100 per 100,000. If this group were a country, it would be more violent than Honduras, the world’s most violent nation. 

www.thursdayfile.com

    theeconomist:

    Who gets murdered in America USA

    The murder rate in America among black men between the ages of 20-24 is over 100 per 100,000. If this group were a country, it would be more violent than Honduras, the world’s most violent nation. 

    www.thursdayfile.com

    — 2 days ago with 711 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf usa  #homicide  #tf chart 

    Photo I: Italian Foreign Minister Federica Mogherini. // Photo II: Map of Ukrain
    EU Sanctions Hit Russian Oil Companies, Lawmakers
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS - September 12, 2014 — Laura Mills in Kiev and Nataliya Vasilyeva in Moscow contributed reporting.
    New European Union sanctions against Russia announced Friday toughen financial penalties on the country’s banks, arms manufacturers and its biggest oil company, Rosneft, to punish Moscow for what the West sees as efforts to destabilize Ukraine.
    The United States was also expected to announce more sanctions Friday.
    The EU measures, which were made official after a preliminary agreement Thursday, broaden the scope of penalties imposed in July. They increase restrictions to Europe’s capital markets, which further limits the targeted Russian companies’ ability to raise money, for example. They now also apply to major oil and defense companies, not only banks.
    Similarly, the EU broadened the scope of existing limits on the export of high-technology goods and items that could also be used for military purposes, so-called dual-use goods.
    The sanctions also ban another 24 officials from traveling to the EU and freeze their assets there. Among the individuals are four deputy Parliament speakers and leaders of the separatists in eastern Ukraine. They also hit businessman Sergey Viktorovich Chemezov, who served in the Soviet intelligence service in Germany alongside President Vladimir Putin during the Cold War and is now known as one of his “close associates,” according to the EU.
    The EU sanctions forbid EU companies from engaging in new contracts in oil drilling, exploration and related services in Russia’s Arctic, deep sea and shale oil projects. Russia’s Rosneft is majority-owned by the state, but Britain’s BP holds a 19.75 percent stake in it.
    The curbs on access to Europe’s financial markets also hit pipeline operator Transneft, the oil subsidiary of Russia’s state-owned energy giant Gazprom and plane maker United Aircraft Corporation.
    Conspicuously absent from the list of targets was Russia’s gas industry, because many EU nations depend on Russian gas imports. The penalties hit only Gazprom’s crude oil subsidiary.
    The sanctions take immediate effect and will be reviewed by EU nations at the end of the month. Russia has threatened to retaliate.
    Speaking at a conference in Kiev on Friday, European Parliament President Martin Schulz said the new sanctions were a sign to Moscow that there is “no return to business as usual.”
    The military conflict between the Ukrainian government and pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine has been raging since mid-April, claiming more than 3,000 lives, according to the UN. Ukraine and the West have accused Russia of providing the rebels with weapons and recruits, which Russia denies.
    The new EU capital market sanctions ban credits and loans with a maturity of over 30 days for the targeted Russian banks and firms. Previous sanctions covered only debt and equity with a maturity of more than 90 days.
    Limiting access to western capital markets curbs lending and is likely to weigh down Russia’s already flagging economy.
    "Even though (targeted) companies are not threatened with an immediate liquidity crisis, the banks and firms concerned will painfully notice, especially the stronger constraints for short-term refinancing," said the managing director of the Association of German Banks, Michael Kemmer.
    Russia’s benchmark MICEX stock index, however, was up 0.8 percent on Friday afternoon and Rosneft shares rose 1.7 percent as investors had already largely factored in the new sanctions. The national currency was down 0.5 percent at the all-time low of 37.7 rubles against the dollar.
    Overall, Brussels has been more reluctant than Washington to sanction Russia because of its economic ties. Moscow is an important gas supplier for many EU nations and is the bloc’s third-largest trading partner. The EU’s sanctions, however, have more impact than those imposed by the U.S. since the EU is by far Russia’s largest trading partner.
    In retaliation for earlier sanctions, Moscow banned food imports from the West, closing a market worth 10 billion euros ($13 billion) a year for European producers.
    Russia has also issued a veiled threat that it could ban Western airlines from using Russian airspace — a move that would lead to higher fuel costs and delays for flights to Asia by European airlines.

    The Washington Post: E.U. tightens sanctions against Russian banks, defense companies and individuals - Article
    —-
    www.Thursdayfile.com

    Q - Will sanctions stop Russia’s invasion into Ukraine?

    — 5 days ago with 5 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf ukraine  #tf russia  #tf europe  #sanctions 

    Photo I: After the Harvest, 1888, 18 1/8 x 30 1/4 inches (46 x 76.8 cm), Oil on canvas, Signed and dated lower left: Kenyon Cox /1888 // Photo II: Kenyon Cox, 1896 // Photo III: Nude study in graphite; preparatory drawing for the allegorical figure of Romance in The Arts mural at the Library of Congress Jefferson Building. Drawing created 1896, digitally restored.

    Kenyon Cox
    Born: October 27, 1856, Warren, Ohio, USA
    Died: March 17, 1919 (aged 62), New York NY, USA - in his home from pneumonia.
    Parents: Jacob Dolson Cox and Helen Finney Cox.
    He was an American painter, illustrator, muralist, writer, and teacher. Cox was an influential and important early instructor at the Art Students League of New York. He was the designer of the League’s logo, whose motto is’ Nulla Dies Sine Linea’ or ‘No Day Without a Line’.
    “… art is not a luxury, it is a civilization.” - Kenyon Cox, The Nation, 1889, quoted in Morgan, Kenyon Cox, 1856-1919: A Life in American Art, 1994

    www.thursdayfile.com
    —-
    Q - If you had the money would you buy one of Cox’s work?

    — 6 days ago with 6 notes
    #tf art  #kenyon cox  #Nude study  #oil  #After the Harves  #tf usa 

    Photo I: Sir Roger said he was ‘distraught’ at co-star Kiel’s death, a week after they reunited for a radio show. // Photo II: Kiel, pictured with fellow Bond villains Christopher Lee, Rick Yune and Toby Stephens, was 7ft 2in tall. // Photo III: in the Bond films as ‘Jaws’ // Photo IV: a younger Kiel
    Richard Kiel (Richard Dawson Kiel)
    Born: September 13, 1939, Detroit, Michigan, USA
    Died: September 10, 2014 (aged 74), Fresno, California, USA
    He was an American actor known for his role of the steel-toothed Jaws in the James Bond movies The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979) as well as the video game Everything or Nothing (he also had cameos in many other James Bond videogames). He was also well known as Mr. Larson in the 1996 comedy Happy Gilmore, for playing the Kanamit aliens in the classic Twilight Zone episode To Serve Man and for his role of Dr. Miguelito Loveless’ assistant Voltaire in first season episodes of The Wild, Wild West (1965-1966).
    Richard Kiel, James Bond villain Jaws actor, dies at 74
    September 11 2014 — BBCnews
    Actor Richard Kiel - who played steel-toothed villain Jaws in two James Bond films - has died in California aged 74.
    The towering American star, who appeared in The Spy Who Loved Me in 1977 and Moonraker in 1979, died in hospital in Fresno on Wednesday.
    A spokeswoman for Saint Agnes Medical Center confirmed Kiel’s death, but did not reveal the cause.
    The 7ft 2in (218.44 cm /2.18m) actor also appeared in the sports comedy Happy Gilmore, starring Adam Sandler, in 1996.
    Kiel made his name as cable-chomping henchman Jaws opposite Roger Moore as 007.
    Sir Roger said he was “totally distraught” at the death of his co-star.
    "We were on a radio programme together just a week ago," said the former Bond star, adding "[I] can’t take it in".
    Kiel and Sir Roger were guests on BBC’s Radio 4 programme The Reunion, which aired on Sunday, along with Bond actress Britt Ekland, recalling their roles in the spy series.
    During the programme, Kiel said he initially thought playing Jaws - a man who killed people with his teeth - could appear “over the top”.
    "I was very put off by the description of the character and I thought, well, they don’t really need an actor, he’s more a monster part," he said.
    "So I tried to change that view of it… I said if I were to play the part, I want to give the character some human characteristics, like perseverance, frustration."
    Sandro Monetti, director at Bafta in Los Angeles and a former showbiz reporter, described Kiel as having “teeth of steel, but a heart of gold”.
    He recalled seeing the actor at James Bond conventions: “It was like seeing kids meeting Santa Claus. Everyone has got such joyous memories of Jaws, and he had time for everybody.”
    Monetti added: “Whenever you mentioned Jaws, his eyes lit up and there was that famous grin.”
    Micky Dolenz, who starred with Kiel in the seminal episode of The Monkees - I was a Teenage Monster, tweeted his memories of the star: “The great character actor and gentle giant.”
    The character of Jaws in The Spy Who Loved Me was originally intended to die at the end of the movie, but he was so popular with fans that Kiel was brought back to reprise the role in Moonraker.
    "The original script had me being killed by the shark," Kiel said.
    "They filmed that and they also filmed an ending where I survive and pop out of the ocean.
    "That was one of the big moments for me, watching the blue-collar screening of the movie, The Spy Who Loved Me, and having the reaction of the crowd at the theatre when Jaws popped out of the ocean, survived and swam away. There were hoots and howling, applause. I couldn’t believe it."
    Born in Detroit, Michigan, Kiel had the hormonal condition acromegaly, which was said to have contributed to his height.
    His first break came in 1959 when he played the alien Kanamit in Twilight Zone.
    He published an autobiography in 2002, called Making It Big In The Movies.
    His many other acting roles included deadly assistant Voltaire in the 1960s TV series The Wild, Wild West; playing opposite William Shatner in the 1970s TV sitcom Barbary Coast; taking on the lead character of Eli Weaver in the movie The Giant of Thunder Mountain; and spoofing his most famous role as “Famous big guy with silver teeth” in the movie version of Inspector Gadget.
    In recent years, he also spent much of his time touring the world and appearing at conventions to meet Bond fans.

    www.thursdayfile.com
    —-
    Q - What do you remember most about Kiel?

    — 6 days ago with 7 notes
    #Richard Kiel  #TF What is up around us  #tf memories  #tf memories 2014  #tf movies  #tf tv  #The Spy Who Loved Me  #Moonraker  #jaws  #tf usa  #james bond 

    Moment in time: Sept. 10, 1993 - The X-Files premieres on prime-time TV
    The show that launched a thousand conspiracy theories began with a scene of a terrified teenager running through the woods. As conceived by relative TV neophyte, Chris Carter (his previous job was editor of Surfing Magazine), The X-Files lent instant - if loosely constructed - validity to the possible existence of aliens, vampires, werewolves, shape-shifters and creepy phenomena previously confined to pulp magazines. Filmed in Vancouver, the opener introduced Gillian Anderson as FBI agent and skeptic Dana Scully and David Duchovny as her partner, Fox Mulder, whose unwavering belief in the paranormal was captured in his nickname: ”Spooky.” Over nine seasons, The X-Files collected three Emmys. Perhaps more important, the show slyly imparted a message that still holds with today’s viewers: Trust no one. — Andrew Ryan
    Notes - 9 seasons with 202 episodes
    - Music: Mark Snow
    - first 5 seasons were filmed in Vancouver Canada
    - the last four were filmed in Los Angeles
    - length: only 44 minutes per episode = 8888 minutes or 148.13 hours total.
    - Original Run: September 10, 1993 – May 19, 2002
    - first episode was written by Chris Carter and had 12 million USA viewers

    — 1 week ago with 70 notes
    #tf moment in time  #tf tv  #x files  #September 10  #1993  #Chris Carter  #Dana Scully  #David Duchovny