Thursday File Buzz

News, photos and quotes I have found interesting.

twitter.com/thursdayfile:

    STOP STEALING DREAMS: On the future of education & what we can do about it. by Seth Godin.

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    Do you agree with Mr. Godin?

    — 9 hours ago with 1 note
    #TF What is up around us  #school  #education  #seth godin 

    most of these knots look the same - I use the Vitoria knot.

    How do you tie your knot?

    (Source: lifemadesimple, via stree)

    — 2 days ago with 116225 notes
    #tf fashions  #menswear  #knots 

    India’s economic growth hits two year high
    August 29 2014 — http://www.bbc.com
     India’s economy grew by 5.7% in the three months to June, its fastest pace in two-and-a-half years, according to an official estimate.
    The economy was helped by strong growth in electricity, gas and water supply, and financial services, the Ministry of Statistics said.
    The growth figure was higher than analysts had been expecting.
    India’s new government has launched policies designed to encourage business investment, including changes to tax.
    Analysis: Sameer Hashmi, India Business Report
    Ever since the Narendra Modi (Photo II) government took charge, business sentiment has improved on the ground. Investors have started pumping in money again, capital markets have been roaring, consumer demand has revived & hiring has picked up.
    But this euphoria is primarily driven by sentiment and more steps would be required to sustain this optimism.
    The performance of the Modi government as it approaches a hundred days in office - has been a mixed one.
    While it has initiated measures to minimize tax litigation and opened up defence manufacturing along with railway infrastructure to attract foreign investors, it is still to announce big bang reforms that would give a major boost to the economy.
    ——
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    — 2 days ago with 3 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf india  #economy  #Narendra Modi 

    Italy lawyers urged to work faster in reform drive
    August 29 2014 — http://www.bbc.com
    Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has announced a series of measures designed to overhaul the country’s notoriously slow justice system.
    His plans include making judges and lawyers work faster and giving them much less time off, as well as speeding up simple divorce cases.
    Mr Renzi said his “revolution” would break down bureaucracy that was having a damaging impact on business activity.
    On average, it takes eight years to resolve a civil case in Italy.
    Trials drag on through round-after-round of appeals.
    A business that goes to court to enforce a contract can wait three years for a verdict - twice as long as in neighbouring France, the BBC’s Alan Johnston in Rome reports.
    And this sort of problem is driving away desperately needed foreign investment into Italy’s economy which recently slumped back into recession, our correspondent says.
    Across the Italian legal system millions of court cases are waiting to be heard, but Mr Renzi promised he would cut that backlog in half.
    But the ambitious young prime minister has only been in office six months, and it remains to be seen quite how much of all this change he will actually be able to deliver, our correspondent adds.
    ——
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    — 2 days ago with 3 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf italy  #lawyers  #judges  #Matteo Renzi  #justice system 
    EU to aid parmesan hit by Russian banAugust 29 2014 — http://www.thelocal.it The Commission said on Thursday it would provide financial aid to help dairy companies store their produce, covering the costs for three to seven months. Funding will initially be offered to producers of butter, skimmed milk powder and cheeses with protected status such as Italy’s Parmigiano-Reggiano (parmesan).The move follows Russia’s decision earlier this month to ban European food imports in response to EU sanctions over Moscow’s role in the Ukraine conflict. Cheese exports from Europe to Russia were worth almost €1 billion last year, while the total value of dairy exports reached €2.3 billion in 2013.The decision was welcomed with “satisfaction” by the Parmigiano-Reggiano Consortium.“This is the response we have been waiting for,” said consortium president Giuseppe Alai.“These measures allow producers to be supported in a critical phrase for the market, in which the Russian embargo closes one of the commercial channels that in recent years has been one of the most interesting in terms of growth,” Alai said in a statement.Italian agriculture association Coldiretti said that while many producers will come to depend on the EU support, the European Commission had not gone far enough.“The total sum allocated is not sufficient to cover the losses and some important Italian products hit by the block remain excluded, for example certain dairy products and those with protected origin,” Coldiretti said online.The agricultural organization put the value of Italy’s dairy exports to Russia at €45 million last year, including €13 million worth of mozzarella not yet covered by the EU aid package.——My home page: www.thursdayfile.com—Join our weekly Digest published on Thursday morning - http://www.thursdayfile.com/Main_Page/TF_Newsletter.html

    EU to aid parmesan hit by Russian ban
    August 29 2014 — http://www.thelocal.it
     The Commission said on Thursday it would provide financial aid to help dairy companies store their produce, covering the costs for three to seven months. Funding will initially be offered to producers of butter, skimmed milk powder and cheeses with protected status such as Italy’s Parmigiano-Reggiano (parmesan).
    The move follows Russia’s decision earlier this month to ban European food imports in response to EU sanctions over Moscow’s role in the Ukraine conflict. Cheese exports from Europe to Russia were worth almost €1 billion last year, while the total value of dairy exports reached €2.3 billion in 2013.
    The decision was welcomed with “satisfaction” by the Parmigiano-Reggiano Consortium.
    “This is the response we have been waiting for,” said consortium president Giuseppe Alai.
    “These measures allow producers to be supported in a critical phrase for the market, in which the Russian embargo closes one of the commercial channels that in recent years has been one of the most interesting in terms of growth,” Alai said in a statement.
    Italian agriculture association Coldiretti said that while many producers will come to depend on the EU support, the European Commission had not gone far enough.
    “The total sum allocated is not sufficient to cover the losses and some important Italian products hit by the block remain excluded, for example certain dairy products and those with protected origin,” Coldiretti said online.
    The agricultural organization put the value of Italy’s dairy exports to Russia at €45 million last year, including €13 million worth of mozzarella not yet covered by the EU aid package.

    ——
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    — 4 days ago with 3 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf italy  #tf europe  #tf russia  #European Commission  #Parmigiano-Reggiano  #dairy  #cheese 

    Clint Eastwood Meets Mister Ed - 1 of 2 (Captioned)

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    — 5 days ago with 3 notes
    #tf tv  #clint eastwood  #mister ed 

    William Greaves
    Born: October 8, 1926, Harlem in New York City, NY, USA
    Died: August 25, 2014, 87, at his home in Manhattan, NY, USA
    He  was a documentary filmmaker and one of the pioneers of African-American filmmaking. He produced over two hundred documentary films, having written and directed more than half of them. Greaves garnered many accolades for his work, including four Emmy nominations.
    US film-maker William Greaves dies aged 87
    The award-winning US broadcaster and film-maker, William Greaves, has died in New York aged 87.
    Greaves’s grand-daughter, Liani, said he had suffered a long illness before he died at home in Manhattan.
    Greaves won an Emmy for co-hosting the 1960s news programme, Black Journal, one of the first current affairs programmes aimed at black viewers.
    His films included documentaries featuring Muhammad Ali, musician Duke Ellington, and poet Langston Hughes.
    Greaves’s film, Ali the Fighter, was one of his most widely-seen productions.
    The documentary told the story of the 1971 championship fight between Ali and Joe Frazier, which Frazier won over 15 rounds.
    In 1991 Greaves told the Associated Press it had been difficult to make the boxers forget they were being filmed.
    Senegal festival
    "When Ali finally caught up with the film, he was amazed," said Greaves.
    "He said, ‘How did you get that? You shot this?’ He was involved with his own life, and he didn’t know what we were doing."
    In 1968 he was asked to co-host Black Journal, which was first screened two months after the assassination of the American civil rights leader, Martin Luther King Jr.
    Black Journal won an Emmy in 1970 for excellence in public affairs.

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    — 5 days ago with 7 notes
    #tf memories  #tf memories 2014  #William Greaves  #TF What is up around us 
    Morning GloryBaked French toast with berry compoteEveryone needs a good French-toast recipe in her arsenal. You know, one that will make houseguests praise your culinary skills but won’t leave you toiling over a hot stove top all morning. Enter our baked French toast. Pick up some fresh brioche from the store, then dip slices into creamy, lightly sweetened egg custard. Right before the baking sheet goes into the oven, top each slice with fresh blueberry-blackberry compote. Voilà—a Top Chef-worthy breakfast without all the fuss.Baked Berry French Toast - A PureWow Original Recipe Makes 4 to 6 servings - Start to Finish: 1 hour Ingredients:for the Berry Compote2 cups blueberries1 cup blackberries¼ cup maple syrup1 tablespoon honey1 teaspoon pure vanilla extractfor the French Toast3 eggs1 cup whole milk½ cup half-and-half⅓ cup maple syrup2 teaspoons cinnamonPinch of nutmegPinch of saltEight 1-inch-thick slices brioche breadDirections:1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.2. Make the berry compote: In a medium pot, mix the blueberries and blackberries with the maple syrup, honey and vanilla extract to combine. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook until the mixture is syrupy but the berries are still mostly whole, 6 to 9 minutes.3. Make the French toast: In a large, shallow dish, whisk the eggs with the milk, half-and-half, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt to combine.4. Dip each bread slice into the custard for 4 to 5 seconds per side, allowing it to soak up some of the liquid.5. Transfer the dipped slices to the prepared baking sheet. When all the bread slices have been dipped, pour the remaining custard over the slices of bread.6. Top each slice with 3 tablespoons of the berry mixture. Bake until the berry mixture is bubbly and the French toast is slightly crisp around the edges, 15 to 17 minutes. Cool slightly before serving. Serve with additional berries, if desired.
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    Morning Glory
    Baked French toast with berry compote
    Everyone needs a good French-toast recipe in her arsenal. You know, one that will make houseguests praise your culinary skills but won’t leave you toiling over a hot stove top all morning. Enter our baked French toast. Pick up some fresh brioche from the store, then dip slices into creamy, lightly sweetened egg custard. Right before the baking sheet goes into the oven, top each slice with fresh blueberry-blackberry compote. Voilà—a Top Chef-worthy breakfast without all the fuss.
    Baked Berry French Toast - A PureWow Original Recipe
    Makes 4 to 6 servings - Start to Finish: 1 hour
    Ingredients:
    for the Berry Compote
    2 cups blueberries
    1 cup blackberries
    ¼ cup maple syrup
    1 tablespoon honey
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    for the French Toast
    3 eggs
    1 cup whole milk
    ½ cup half-and-half
    ⅓ cup maple syrup
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    Pinch of nutmeg
    Pinch of salt
    Eight 1-inch-thick slices brioche bread

    Directions:
    1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
    2. Make the berry compote: In a medium pot, mix the blueberries and blackberries with the maple syrup, honey and vanilla extract to combine. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook until the mixture is syrupy but the berries are still mostly whole, 6 to 9 minutes.
    3. Make the French toast: In a large, shallow dish, whisk the eggs with the milk, half-and-half, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt to combine.
    4. Dip each bread slice into the custard for 4 to 5 seconds per side, allowing it to soak up some of the liquid.
    5. Transfer the dipped slices to the prepared baking sheet. When all the bread slices have been dipped, pour the remaining custard over the slices of bread.
    6. Top each slice with 3 tablespoons of the berry mixture. Bake until the berry mixture is bubbly and the French toast is slightly crisp around the edges, 15 to 17 minutes. Cool slightly before serving. Serve with additional berries, if desired.

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    — 5 days ago with 4 notes
    #TF Food  #TF Recipes  #baked berry french toast  #french toast  #breakfast  #lunch  #berries 

    India’s Narendra Modi to launch bank accounts for all
    August 28 2014 - BBCnews
    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (photo II) is to launch a plan to provide a bank account for every household, in a landmark initiative to help the poor.
    Nearly 40% of Indians have little access to financial services and are often at the mercy of moneylenders who charge extortionate interest.
    Mr Modi has told state and private banks to support the plan.
    Correspondents say taking banking to the poor, who may have no identity papers, will be a challenge.
    "There are millions of families who have mobile phones but no bank accounts. We have to change this scenario," Mr Modi said in his first Independence Day speech on 15 August.
    Reports say Mr Modi’s government aims to provide bank accounts to 75 million households by 2018, and to have two account-holders per household.
    'Single disability'
    Under the banking scheme, account holders would receive a debit card and accident insurance cover of up to 100,000 rupees ($1,654; £996). They would also get an overdraft facility of up to 5,000 rupees.
    Mr Modi said there was an “urgency to this exercise as all other development activities are hindered by this single disability”.
    Correspondents say increased financial inclusion will help the government pay welfare benefits directly into bank accounts and cut corruption.
    Data provided by the World Bank shows that just 4% of Indians receive government payments through bank accounts.
    The scheme will also help diminish the influence of moneylenders and other informal lending agencies who operate outside the control of the country’s central bank.
    Vijay Advani, executive vice-president of Franklin Templeton Investments, told the AFP news agency that the plan was an "unique opportunity [for India] to re-invent its approach to financial inclusion".
    But one of the main impediments to the plan could be the lack of identity documents among the poor - people have to produce a number of papers, including birth certificates and proof of address, to open a bank account in India.
    "For the common man, the opening of a bank account is a Herculean task," NSN Reddy, chief manager of the state-run Andhra Bank said.
    But India’s Central Bank Governor Raghuram Rajan has said the scheme will help the poor to gain “economic independence” by providing insurance and credit.

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    — 5 days ago with 3 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf India  #banks  #Narendra Modi 

    Photo I: Henry Gonzalez cleaned after a pipe burst at City Winery in Napa. Credit Jim Wilson. // Photo II: Nola Rawlins surveyed the remains of her home - Peter Dasilva. // Photo III: The earthquake shook wine bottles at Van’s Liquors in Napa, Calif., off their shelves. Credit Justin Sullivan.
    Losses From California Quake Could Top $1 Billion
    Quentin Hardy reported from Napa, Calif., and Ian Lovett from Los Angeles. Rick Rojas contributed reporting from New York, and Jim Kerstetter from Napa. — AUG. 24, 2014 — http://www.nytimes.com
    NAPA, Calif. — Early Sunday morning, Franz Oehler’s house blew apart.
    “My girlfriend and I were thrown straight in the air, and the windows exploded,” said Mr. Oehler, a 44-year-old creative director, whose home is nestled among some of the country’s most celebrated vineyards.
    A magnitude-6.0 earthquake hit the Napa Valley at 3:20 a.m. Sunday — the strongest temblor in the San Francisco Bay Area in a quarter-century — destroying both opulent and modest homes, rupturing dozens of water and gas mains and causing injuries, mostly minor, to more than 100 people.
    Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency, and directed state resources toward a recovery effort in Napa.
    At least 120 people had been treated at the emergency room at Queen of the Valley Medical Center in Napa, said Vanessa deGier, a hospital spokeswoman. Most of the injuries were minor lacerations or abrasions caused by falling debris. But three patients were in critical condition, including a child who had been crushed by a falling fireplace. No deaths had been confirmed as of Sunday evening.
    The shaking was felt as far off as Salinas, almost 120 miles away, and the United States Geological Survey estimated that economic losses could be up to $1 billion.
    Despite the widespread damage, scientists said California was fortunate to escape greater devastation from the earthquake, which exposed gaps in the state’s preparedness. The historic 1906 San Francisco earthquake was about 500 times larger than Sunday’s temblor.
    “It is truly small — small compared to what California has experienced in its recorded history,” said Ross S. Stein, a geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey.
    “We owe wine country in part to earthquakes,” which created the Napa Valley terrain that is so suitable to vineyards, he said. “We all want to enjoy the fruits of the quakes, so we all have to prepare for the downside, too.”
    However geologically small, the earthquake unleashed chaos in many parts of the Napa Valley, a serene escape known for its fine dining.
    At Mr. Oehler’s home, a skylight shattered and stone sculptures flew into the air. The swimming pool cracked open, flooding his steep hillside. “There was noise everywhere from the earthquake and the walls cracking,” he said.
    From the terrace he said he saw flames rising in the valley below.
    Several fires broke out following the earthquake, including one at a mobile home park that destroyed six homes, the authorities said.
    Two residents of the park, Lynda and Bob Castell-Blanch, both 60, were jarred awake by a loud thump, followed by rolling. The park soon shot up in flames.
    “It was violent,” said Mr. Castell-Blanch, whose home was not among those that burned. “Things were flying all over the place. There was a woman screaming from one of the houses, so loud it was total mayhem.”
    Because a nearby water main had ruptured, however, firefighters were unable to tap into the hydrant to fight the fire, and had to truck in water from elsewhere.
    The Castell-Blanchs said they had enough time to gather their cats and Mr. Castell-Blanch’s vintage guitars before fleeing. “That was all we had time for,” he said.
    They went to a nearby store, the Ranch Market, to try to buy water, but the shelves had been emptied. The smell of wine from broken bottles wafted through the store.
    Arik Housley, the store’s owner, estimated at least $100,000 in damage at the two markets he owned in the area. Like many people, he said he did not carry earthquake insurance because the premium was high.
    By Sunday evening, more than 10,000 people remained without power, and parts of the city still smelled of natural gas. About 600 homes were without water.
    Much of the heaviest damage was in downtown Napa, where large sections of brick had fallen from the county courthouse and other historic buildings. Three of the buildings that sustained severe damage had not been retrofitted to withstand earthquakes, city officials said, while the retrofits on some other older buildings did not hold, and large sections of brick and concrete collapsed onto the sidewalks.
    More than 30 buildings across the city were deemed uninhabitable.
    “Certainly, a few of the retrofits didn’t fare that well,” said a Napa County supervisor, Mark Luce. He added that many more buildings, including the county administrative building, had interior damage including broken sprinkler lines and fallen ceilings that would be costly to repair. “The newer buildings that met current standards fared better, but there’s still a lot of mess to clean up inside,” he said.
    “We’ll look at what happened with these couple buildings where we saw these failures, and see if there’s anything we missed,” Mr. Luce added. “We’ve had a live test of what a 6.0 earthquake will do.”
    Kelly Houston, a spokesman for the California Emergency Management Agency, said the quake was also a reminder that virtually the entire state — not just Los Angeles and San Francisco — was at risk.
    “This is definitely a wake-up call, especially for the people in Napa Valley,” Mr. Houston said. “Maybe folks there think they don’t have to worry as much because they don’t live in San Francisco.”
    In the hills outside this city, winemakers like David Duncan, whose family owns the Silver Oak Winery, rued the loss of “irreplaceable” wine that fell from the shelves in one of its cellars.
    “It was everything — hundreds of bottles of broke,” Mr. Duncan said.
    Mr. Oehler, as he picked his way through shards of marble and glass, also counted an irreplaceable loss, his home.
    “We spent a lot of money and love on this place” he said. “It’s all gone now. It’s cracking and sliding down the hill.”

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    — 6 days ago with 4 notes
    #TF What is up around us  #tf wine  #tf usa  #California  #napa  #tf earthquake